Advanced Accounting Chapter 10

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Chapter 15
Partnerships: termination and liquidation

Answers to Questions

1. A dissolution refers to the cessation of a partnership. In many cases, this process is simply a preliminary step in the transfer of business property to a newly formed partnership. Therefore, a dissolution does not necessarily affect the operations of the business. In a liquidation, however, actual business activities must cease. Partnership property is sold with the remaining cash distributed to creditors and to any partners with positive capital balances. Dissolution refers to changes in the composition of a partnership whereas liquidation is the selling of a partnership's assets.

2. Many reasons can exist that would lead to the termination and liquidation of a partnership. The business might simply have failed to generate sufficient profits or the partners may elect to enter other lines of work. Liquidation can also be required by the death, retirement, or withdrawal of one of the partners. In such cases, liquidation is often necessary to settle the partner's interest in the business. The bankruptcy of an individual partner can also force the termination of the business as can the bankruptcy of the partnership itself.

3. During the liquidation process, monitoring the balance of the partners' capital accounts becomes of paramount importance. That amount will eventually indicate either the cash to be received by the partners as final distributions or the additional contributions that they are required to pay. Consequently, all liquidation gains and losses are recorded directly as changes to these capital balances. Such recording enhances the informational value of the accounts. As an additional factor, the computation of a net income figure is of diminished importance since normal operations have ceased.

4. Final distributions made to the various partners…...

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