Brine

In: English and Literature

Submitted By schmichael15
Words 325
Pages 2
schmichael
Brine Shrimp lab 2013
9/10/13

Introduction
Artemia salina or (Brine Shrimp) belong to the Anthropoda phylum. Brine Shrimp are found in a variety of different habitats, ranging from temporary ponds to estuaries, lakes and rivers. A Brine Shrimp’s ability to inhabit various environments can be attributed to their tolerance of a range of salinities. Brine Shrimp have been found to survive in salinities from 0% to 15%. When hatching Brine Shrimp the highest number of eggs will hatch at a salinity of 7.5%. The ability to adapt to new environments gives Brine Shrimp a distinct advantage among their aquatic community, and allows them to successfully reproduce and survive within their environment.

Materials and Methods

In determining the optimal salinity for hatching brine shrimp eggs, seven samples were made with salinities ranging from 0%, 3.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 12.5%, and 15%. Four trials were performed for each of the seven samples.

The room temperature and the water used were both at 72°F. The salt used to create the samples was supplied by Carolina Biological Supply Company. The seven ranging salinities were prepared in 100 mL samples. Seven masses of salt were measured on a scale (0g, 3.5g, 5g, 7.5g, 10g, 12.5g, and 15g) and were corresponded to a beaker filled with 100 mL of distilled water. For each sample, four trials were replicated by filling 30 mL plastic vials with 25 mL of solution. 2400 cysts (one leveled scoop) were placed in each vial. After preparing four vials for each of the seven samples, the Brine Shrimp were given 24 hours to hatch. On the following day, each plastic vial was shook gently to mix the solution. 100 micrometers were extracted using a micropipette and were dispersed onto a slide. Each slide was examined under a compound light…...

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