Coconut Shell Charcoal

In: Science

Submitted By yorick
Words 680
Pages 3
CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY
PREPARATION

First - You need to gather all the coconuts ( ready to harvest) in one place...It's easy to do the job when they are gathered together...

Second - Husk all the coconut; separate the husk and the whole coconut shell unbroken.

Third - Break the whole coconut shell in the middle ( put it all together in one place)..Take out the white thing or the meat (Copra) using some tools.....(There is water inside the coconut when you break it...Find a place far from fruits it makes the fruit wither when it absorbs too much water from the coconut)

Forth - Let the empty coconut shell under the sun from 1 to 2 days....( To make it dry - the drier the coconut shell is the better result of charcoal).

MAKING THE CHARCOAL ( 5 to 6 hours or let the charcoal inside the Drum overnight)

Things Needed:

- Empty 55 gallon Metal Gasoline Drum ( without top lid)

- Coconut shells

- Match

- Covering ( Fresh banana bark - flattaned (10 -15 pieces)

- Heavy things ( Rock, pile of woods, etc)

Step 1 - Put the Drum in a flat surface or to make it safer you can make a round hole, 1 ft deep, bury the bottom part of the drum with lid and cover it with soil.

Step 2 - File the coconut shells ( one is on the top of anotther) in circle form up to the brim of the drum leaving a small space in the middle of the circle.

Step 3 - Take a piece of a coconut shell and make a fire and put it in the middle of the circle on the file.Wait for how many minutes till the fire kindled the other coconut shells below...Then, drop or add some coconut shells in the middle of the circle where you started the fire, slowly and make sure that the fire ignition below will not stop. Fill all the space in the drum up to the brim or 1 ft higher.

Step 4 - Let the fire inside continue but don't to check your drum every now and then by pressing coconut…...

Similar Documents

The Potential of Coconut Bagasse in Making White Charcoal

...com/republicactno8048.htm REPUBLIC ACT NO. 8048  . AN ACT PROVIDING FOR THE REGULATION OF THE CUTTING OF COCONUT TREES, ITS REPLENISHMENT, PROVIDING PENALTIES THEREFOR AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. The Republic Act No. 8048, also known as the “Coconut Preservation Act of 1995”, states the importance, conservation and replanting of coconut trees. The act was approved on June 7, 1995 http://www.ustcivillaw.com/Republic%20Acts/RepActNo6260.php REPUBLIC ACT NO. 6260 AN ACT INSTITUTING A COCONUT INVESTMENT FUND AND CREATING A COCONUT INVESTMENT COMPANY FOR THE ADMINISTRATION THEREOF. The republic act no. 6260, also known as the coconut investment act, states the development of the coconut industry through the provision of adequate medium and long-term financing for capital investment in the industry by creating a corporation to be known as the "Coconut Investment Company". It was approved on June 19, 1971 http://www.chanrobles.com/republicacts/republicactno4403.html REPUBLIC ACT NO. 4403 REPUBLIC ACT NO. 4403 - AN ACT ENCOURAGING THE ORGANIZATION OF AGRO-INDUSTRIAL COCONUT COOPERATIVES UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE PHILIPPINE COCONUT ADMINISTRATION, AMENDING FOR THE PURPOSE REPUBLIC ACT NUMBERED ELEVEN HUNDRED FORTY-FIVE | | The republic act no. 4403 states the aim  to help planters and processors organize themselves into associations and/or agro-industrial coconut cooperatives with a view to giving them greater control in the marketing of their products, to help them......

Words: 873 - Pages: 4

Charcoal

...ANGELICUM COLLEGE Quezon City An Investigatory Project: Charcoal Leaves as an alternative for cooking Presented to: Ms. Rowelyn Molina In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements in Physics Submitted by: Christine Siatan Edbal Cajilig Laura Coronel Tristan Yapchiongco Japeth Mendoza Ericka Dizon Gabriel Cabacungan Jetrix Jose Abstract Dried leaves are the main material in the project. The purpose of doing the project is to find an alternative if the ordinary is not available. And the researchers need to find a sufficient and a good alternative so people will not buy charcoal, instead they will do it on their house and cook their own food using this dried leaves charcoal. Flour, water and dried leaves are the main materials of the dried leaves charcoal. To make it: First, burn a three plastic bags of dried leaves until it turn into ashes. Then, put it on a container and put a half cup of water (depends o how many ashes). Put flour and mix it carefully after that mold it to any shape and get the blower or put it on a hot surface. After it dries. The charcoal is now ready to be used. The researchers found out that dried leaves charcoal is a good alternative if the ordinary charcoal is not available. And both the charcoals produce same heat but don’t fire up at the same rate. But both of it can cook food, has the same color of fire and has any size. But you need many dried leaves charcoal to cook food Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction ...

Words: 828 - Pages: 4

Charcoal

...ABSTRACT Dried leaves are the main material in the project. The purpose of doing the project is to find an alternative if the ordinary is not available. And the researchers need to find a sufficient and a good alternative so people will not buy charcoal, instead they will do it on their house and cook their own food using this dried leaves charcoal. Flour, water and dried leaves are the main materials of the dried leaves charcoal. To make it. First, burn a three plastic bags of dried leaves until it turn into ashes. Then, put it on a container and put a half cup of water (depends o how many ashes). Put flour and mix it carefully after that mold it to any shape and get the blower or put it on a hot surface. After it dries. The charcoal is now ready to be used. The researchers found out that dried leaves charcoal is a good altervantive if the ordinary charcoal is not available. And both the charcoals produce same heat but don’t fire up at the same rate. But both of it can cook food, has the same color of fire and has any size. But you need many dried leaves charcoal to cook food. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The success of the project is not possible without the support of the followig. First to Our Almighty God for guiding ang giving the researchers’ knowledge. Second, to the researchers’ supportive parents for their finance and working place. Third, to their teachers and classmates for educational advice. And lastly, to their inspirations. The researchers wishes the best for their......

Words: 272 - Pages: 2

Paper Charcoal

...Activated Charcoal: Good or Bad?   Activated charcoal is charcoal that has been treated with oxygen, which makes it more porous and increases its surface area. This also increases its capacity to absorb gases and liquids, which works by chemically binding the impurities to the carbon surface. Activated charcoal is most typically utilized to remove odorous substances from the atmosphere.  Wood, peat, coconut shells, coal and sawdust are the most common materials used for making activated charcoal. Activated charcoal is most commonly found in aquarium filters, drinking-water filters and air filters; and has a role in the treatment of ingested poisons for humans. What is Charcoal? Charcoal is produced from the combustion of plant material, most typically wood, and closely resembles coal. It is extensively produced in the developing world, where it is used as a fuel for cooking and heating requirements. It is produced by heating wood at a low temperature in the absence of oxygen. All that remains after this process is the black carboniferous material know as charcoal. Activated Charcoal for Human Health Activated charcoal is utilized in human health, particularly in the treatment of poisoning, where it is ingested to counter the effects of a chemical.  It is generally produced in a powdered form, which can be mixed with water and consumed as a suspension, or as a food supplement for where it comes in small, readily digested tablets or capsules. This form of activated......

Words: 412 - Pages: 2

Charcoal

...Fuel from the Fields Charcoal Fuel from the Fields charcoal is an inexpensive, clean-burning, environmentally friendly alternative cooking fuel that is made from agricultural waste materials and thus does not lead to deforestation. This instruction sheet explains how to make Fuel from the Fields charcoal; the process can and should be adapted to your local environment. We encourage you to experiment and let us know your results (you can email us at charcoal@mit.edu) 1 Elements for making Charcoal The main step in making Fuel from the Fields charcoal is carbonization, which requires three things: dry organic material (also called biomass), heat, and control of the amount of oxygen. The biomass may be any of a variety of agricultural waste materials including: corncobs, sugarcane waste (bagasse), millet stalks, groundnut shells, palm leaves or bamboo. It must be very dry in order to burn properly. The heat is generated by setting the biomass on fire, and the oxygen-free environment is created by sealing the drum with sand or soil.  The carbonized material is then crushed, mixed with a binder, and then made into briquettes. Biomass Heat Oxygen Control 2 1. Preparing the Kiln A 55 gallon oil drum can be used as a kiln to make charcoal Cut a large opening for filling Cut several holes in the the kiln with the material you bottom of the drum. These want to carbonize. holes allow air to flow through the drum while burning, which results in a hotter......

Words: 761 - Pages: 4

Low-Tech Coconut Shell Activated Carbon Production

...1555-9033 Low-Tech Coconut Shell Activated Charcoal Production Ami Cobb Senior, Department of Civil Engineering Santa Clara University Santa Clara, CA 95053 AmiCobb@gmail.com Mikell Warms Senior, Department of Civil Engineering Santa Clara University Santa Clara, CA 95053 Mikell.Warms@gmail.com Dr. Edwin P. Maurer Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering Santa Clara University Santa Clara, CA 95053 EMaurer@scu.edu Dr. Steven Chiesa Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering Santa Clara University Santa Clara, CA 95053 SChiesa@scu.edu Abstract – Water treatment technologies in the developing world typically focus on removing two types of impurities from water sources: suspended solids and microbial pathogens. However, as industrialization and high-input agriculture has expanded into the developing world, chemical impurities such as pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers have found their way into drinking water supplies and have been linked to severe health-related issues. Activated carbon has the capacity to remove these problematic chemicals from water sources. A simple, inexpensive, and effective activated carbon production process using local agricultural waste byproducts was assessed for the community of Bluefields, Nicaragua. Coconut shell charcoal was produced on site, and various chemical activation techniques were investigated. The adsorption capacity of three separate chemically activated coconut shell charcoals was analyzed,......

Words: 5521 - Pages: 23

Coconut Charcoal

...THE USE OF BIOMASS WASTES TO FABRICATE CHARCOAL SUBSTITUTES IN KENYA Feasibility Study forming part of the Shell Foundation-supported project on charcoal briquetting in Kenya March 2004 Chardust Ltd. P.O. Box 24371 Nairobi and Spectrum Technical Services P.O. Box 69993 Nairobi Executive Summary This study was designed by Chardust Ltd. and implemented jointly by Chardust and Spectrum Technical Services, a Nairobi-consulting firm. The aim was to determine the viability of producing briquetted charcoal fuel from biomass wastes in Kenya. The study was funded by the Shell Foundation and conducted over a two month period in late 2003. The viability of producing fuel commercially from biomass wastes was assessed from four perspectives: (a) Availability: Existence and accessibility of biomass in bulk, preferably with no competing uses. The study began with a list of 28 potential wastes, which was narrowed down to 20 and then to just ten, according to a ranking system based upon basic availability and accessibility. (b) Conversion Potential: Physical suitability for drying, carbonisation and briquetting. Samples of the ten short-listed wastes were sourced and delivered to Chardust in Nairobi, where production trials were carried out. Based on these trials, a ranking system was devised for comparing the wastes in terms of their suitability for fuel production. (c) Fuel Quality: Energy value and general performance of fabricated fuel. The third part of the study......

Words: 14061 - Pages: 57

Dried Leaves as Charcoal

...briquettes from dried banana leaves and waste papers Coconut sheath substitute of abaca fiber Commercial glue from Talisay resin Butter derive from marang (Artocarpus odoratissima) seed Marang seeds as alternative source for commercial flour 02 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. Compendium of investigatory studies Basic geological concepts Maps and compass Rocks and fire Fungus Puccinia graminis as mycoherbicide 03 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. Sea cucumber (Cucumaria miniamata) as a potential source of leather Fiberglass from Apitong sap (Dipterocarpus grandiflorus) Rat killer extract from tuble roots Tetrodotoxin from bile of puffer (Sphoeroides maculates) as a potential source of stem borer pesticide V. VI. VII. VIII. Glue out of cigarette filer and acetone Roof sealant out of Styrofoam and gasoline Radical pesticide from garongin Chaetomorpha aerea a potential source of biogas 04 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Sawdust as an alternative source for corkboard Woodcraft from banana peduncle Lumber from carabao manure Herbal leaves produced herbal ointment The wonder of Cobong plant Cyperus Esculenta Cassaw-dustenta as decorative Newsaw – Casco as Décor The potential of black plastic bag as heat enhancer for guso solar dryer 05 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. Dalupang (Urena lobata) as potential source of commercial fibers Styrofoam and powdered oyster shells as tiles Strong fiber to replace abaca Banana......

Words: 5133 - Pages: 21

Coconut

...Successful Factors of Exporting The Coconut from Indonesia to Zaimin Industry, Malaysia http://atjehpost.co/articles/read/971/Malaysia-Siap-Tampung-1-Juta-Kelapa-Tiap-Bulan-dari-Aceh “Kita sepakat ekspor kelapa 1 juta butir setiap bulannya melalui Pelabuhan Krueng Geukueh dan Langsa,” kata Safwan. NEGARA Malaysia siap menampung satu juta butir kelapa tiap bulannya dari Provinsi Aceh. Kesepakatan ini tercapai dari kunjungan Menteri Pertanian dan Industri Asas Tani Malaysia, Dato’ Sri Ismail Sabri bin Yakoob, Minggu 2 Maret 2014. Hal ini diungkapkan oleh Kepala Dinas Perindustrian dan Perdagangan (Kadisperindag) Aceh, Safwan SE MSi. “Kita sepakat ekspor  kelapa 1 juta butir setiap bulannya melalui Pelabuhan Krueng Geukueh dan Langsa,” kata Safwan. Sebenarnya, kata dia, ekspor kelapa dari Aceh ke Malaysia ini sudah berlangsung lama. “Banyak pengusaha yang mengambil kelapa dari Aceh, tetapi ekspor dari Batam.Ada yang melalui Krueng Geukueh, tapi hanya sedikit,” kata Safwan lagi. Namun kata Safwan, di bawah Pemerintahan Aceh saat ini, segala bentuk ekspor komoditas dari Aceh, juga akan difokuskan pada pelabuhan yang ada di Aceh. Salah satunya seperti Krueng Geukueh. Sebelumnya diberitakan, Dato’ Sri Ismail Sabri bin Yakoob, mengaku terkejut ketika mengetahui kalau kelapa yang mereka impor (Malaysia-red) selama ini ternyata berasal dari Provinsi Aceh. Padahal, kata dia, Malaysia menerima impor kelapa dari Indonesia melalui Pelabuhan Batam. “Saya heran, kelapa Aceh......

Words: 3171 - Pages: 13

Charcoal

...2014; 216: 409–413. Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). Dental interventions to prevent caries in children (SIGN publication no. 138). [March 2014]. Edinburgh: SIGN, 2014. National Dental Inspection Programme. Report of the 2013 detailed national dental inspection programme of primary 7 children and the basic inspection of primary 1 and primary 7 children. Online report available at http://isdscotland. scot.nhs.uk/Health-Topics/Dental-Care/ Publications/2013-10-29/2013-10-29-NDIPReport.pdf (accessed May 2014). Statement of Dental Remuneration. Amendment no. 124. 1 November 2013. Online information available at http://www.psd.scot.nhs.uk/professionals/dental/AmendmentNo124.pdf (accessed May 2014). Fig. 1 Toothbrush with charcoal bristles 3. 4. DOI: 10.1038/sj.bdj.2014.556 Mazzafera P. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS of imidazole alkaloids in Pilocarpus microphyllus. Molecules 2008; 13: 1518–1529. Moura E F, Pinto J E B P, Santos J B, Lameira O A. Genetic diversity in a jaborandi (Pilocarpus microphyllus Stapf.) germplasm bank assessed by RAPD markers. Rev Bras Pl Med Botucatu 2005; 7: 1–8. of this alkaloid and produce pilocarpine from callus cell lines in order to save this endangered species.1 New methods of detection of pilocarpine are being employed. Alexndra Sawya and Ilka Abreu used HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) method to detect pilocarpine in paste that is left over after industrial extraction of......

Words: 1182 - Pages: 5

Charcoal

...COCONUT SHELLS AS A SHOE POLISH ABSTRACT The study focused in making a specialized shoe polish from burned dried coconut husk. It aimed to prove the effectivity of the product in terms of some parametric measurements based on the preferences made by respondents. The parameters were adapted from written reviews for top commercial products. Also, this was made to test if there are really no significant difference between the output of the study and the existing product in the market. After gathering data through rating scales issued to the respondents of the study, it showed an average of 4.18. This mean rating was compared to a standard mean obtained by averaging the ratings of predominant commercial products. With the data obtained, the study implied that there is no significant difference between the effectivity of the shoe polish from burned dried coconut husk and the effectivity of the commercial shoe polish. INTRODUCTION Background of the study The coconut is the fruit of the most economically important member of the great palm family, Palmae. The genus cocos is Southeast Asian and contains only one species, C. Nucifera. Cultivated in tropical lowlands, almost always near the sea, the coconut has long been distributed throughout Southeast Asia and along the Tropical African and American coasts. For centuries, the coconut pal has supplied the people of the Pacific Islands with food, drink, shelter, and most of their needs. The roots furnish...

Words: 2195 - Pages: 9

Charcoal

...with tough, dry skin covered with horny scales. 3. _____________ are warm-blooded animals and breathe through their lungs. 4. _____________ are cold-blooded animals with moist and slippery skin. 5. This is a group of aquatic animals. They live in water all their life. We call this group of vertebrates as _______________. mammals birds fish reptiles amphibians 47 Lesson 26: Identify characteristic of each group of vertebrates. (PELC 4-2-1) Exercise B Directions: Using a line, match each vertebrate in Column A with their characteristics in Column B. 1. fishes A. Feed their young with milk 2. amphibians B. only animals with feathers 3. reptiles C. breathe through their gills 4. birds D. cold blooded animals with scales and shell coverings 5. mammals E. live in both land and water 48 Lesson 27: Classify invertebrates into arthropods, coelenterates, annelids, crustaceans, echinoderms, insects, arachnids, and mollusk Exercise A Directions: Classify these animals by writing their names under the proper column earthworm jellyfish butterfly sponges sea cucumber corals crab squid tarantula Invertebrates Coelenterates Echinoderms Annelids Insects Crustaceans Arachnids 49 Mollusks Lesson 27: Classify invertebrates into arthropods, coelenterates, annelids, crustaceans, echinoderms, insects, arachnids, and mollusk Exercise B Directions: Classify the following invertebrate. Write AR, if it is an arthropods; CO, coelenterates, AN, annelids; CR,......

Words: 23678 - Pages: 95

Mango Peel Charcoal

...The Effectiveness of Mango (Mangifera indica) Peels As Alternative Source of Charcoal A Research Paper Presented to the Faculty of Antipolo National High School in partial fulfillment of the course requirement in Research II COLEEN INGRID S. MIRAVALLES DONITA S. ESTRELLA KREANNE IRISH J. MILLANO ANGELA LEONOR M. MUTUC Researchers CLUSTER 1: APPLIED SCIENCE TEAM CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Economic crisis runs throughout different places in the world. The Global Economic Crisis pulled countries down from around the globe to a recession. Wide-ranging declines in many aspects of growth characterize the overall impact it had on the global scale. This is the main reason why people tend to lessen the spend of money. To reduce spending, households had to buy cheaper goods, for example, instead of buying branded clothes; people tend to buy more affordable clothes. People also tend to lessen the electricity and water consumption. Another way is using charcoals instead of Liquefied Petroleum Gas or LPG in preparing or cooking their food. Almost all of us are aware of Global warming. It is the unusual increase in the Earth's surface temperature since describe the beginning of the 20th century. Scientists believe that this is caused by some human activities like illegal logging, deforestation, burning of garbage, fumes of factories, and smoke from vehicles, improper deposal of garbage and regular using of insecticides. The greenhouse effect is a vital natural process......

Words: 3388 - Pages: 14

Charcoal

...Production of Charcoal using Different Kinds of Dried Leaves Submitted By: Andrew Matthew Ortoño April Mae Quilago Mary Karen Luceñara Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements in Research III Bacolod City National High School October 20,2015 Ms. Maria Vonessa Miraflores Research Adviser Background of the Study: For now on our life are become easier because of the technology. Technology is very important for us and even in cooking it become easier to cook. We used the LPG or a stove and other things we need in cooking. Because of this highly - invented materials, it makes our life easier. And other ways to cook is using a charcoal that is made of different kinds of trees and it is our big problem. The big problem is we should cut down trees in order to make charcoals but it may result some risk not only on ourselves but our surroundings also. Because of this problem we need to help to prevent from risk. According to our investigatory project, we study how to reduce cutting down trees to make a charcoal and studied to make a charcoal using different kinds of dried leaves like Mango leaves, Papaya leaves and etc.. It is just a dried leaves but it has its own purpose to make a charcoal to lessen of cutting down the trees. And because of this project we can help to prevent a big problem in our country. Significance of the Study: People need food in order to survive. They usually use LPG, which may have risks and may be too much expensive......

Words: 846 - Pages: 4

Coconut Charcoal

...the Study Charcoal is the dark grey residue consisting of impure carbon obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. Charcoal is usually produced by slow pyrolysis, the heating of wood or other substances in the absence of oxygen. The resulting soft, brittle, lightweight, black, material resembles coal. It has been used since the earliest times for a range of purposes including art and medicine, but by far its most important use has been as a metallurgical fuel. Prior to the industrial revolution charcoal was occasionally used as a cooking fuel. Philippines is the Top 1 among the coconut producing countries. For coconut is abundant in our country, it is popular for its culinary purposes, commercial, industrial, and household uses, and medical applications. Coconut shells with husks are used to buff wooden floors, making it clean and shiny (free from dusts). Here in the Philippines, it is known as “bunot”. The husk and shells can be used for fuel and are a source of charcoal. Coconut shells/husks are usually left around and are considered wastes besides making them into husks. To get benefits from them, by a primitive process, they can be produced to charcoal which can be an alternative fuel especially for cooking. B. Statement of the Problem The study aims to produce charcoal using coconut (Cocos nucifera) fibers. Specifically, it seeks to find answers for the following questions: 1. How much charcoal can......

Words: 2054 - Pages: 9