Communicating with Families in the Urban School

In: Social Issues

Submitted By dslagle
Words 1306
Pages 6
Running head: COMMUNICATING WITH FAMILIES IN THE URBAN SCHOOL 1

Communicating With Families in the Urban School
David L Slagle
Western Governor’s University

COMMUNICATING WITH FAMILIES 2
Communicating With Families in the Urban School In this essay, I will examine a speech presented by a teacher to the parents of the students in her classroom. The teacher works in an urban school which qualifies for federal funding due to the number of low-income families that populate the area. In order to present an accurate and relevant conclusion, we will examine how the teacher could have given a more appropriate and sensitive speech to this culturally diverse audience.
There are several instances of sensitivity in this speech, as well as insensitivity. The teacher first acknowledges the parents by thanking them for coming. This is a good starting point to make the parents more comfortable and to show that this meeting is about their role. She follows up her welcome by stating that she wants to have frequent communication with the parents. In order to facilitate that, the teacher has developed a disclosure statement which clearly defines her classroom environment, grading, and what is expected of the student. This is an effective tool for parents and students to refer to throughout the year. Another resource the teacher presents is the school's web site, explaining that she has provided directions and email information in the disclosure statement.
All three of these instances of sensitivity are excellent ways for the parent to be actively involved in their child’s education. Acknowledging the parent as essential to the success of the student, gives the parent a sense of usefulness to the teacher. Parents report that, “Frequent use by teachers of parent involvement leads parents to report that they receive…...

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