Crimes of the Powerful

In: Social Issues

Submitted By bubu123
Words 2781
Pages 12
In modern capitalist societies, according to Marxists, the ruling ideas in a society are the ideas of the ruling class. The class that owns the means of production, also owns the means of mental production, thus the ruling classes inform and influence legislation and policy in order to reflect their ideologies. The term ideology is embedded from German philosophers, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engles; such ideologies include the system of institutions such as family, churches, the education system, and mass media. The ideologies of the ruling class thus render the working class (proletariat) into conformity by persuading them that the interests of the capitalists (bourgeoisie) are also in the interest of the working class. These ideologies defend and uphold the social position of the ruling classes. Jeffery Reimen stated that, the rich get richer and the poor get prison, thus, as the laws reflect the ideologies of the ruling class, there cannot be equality before the law, as the law protects those who define it. This essay will demonstrate the issue of the justice system within capitalist societies and the effects of the law and policy formations that reflect the wishes and ideologies of the ruling class, while exploiting the poor. The broad theory of critical criminology also known as radical criminology, explores various theoretical perspectives, specifically Marxist criminology and labeling theory. In light of these perspectives, this essay will provide insight on the disproportionate and bias treatment of the criminal justice system. White-collar crime (corporate crimes) and blue-collar crime (street crimes) will be used as illustrations of the disproportion of class systems within capitalist societies in terms of the criminal justice system, which further address how legislations and policies reflect the wishes ideologies and of the ruling class.

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