Gender and Development

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ANTH 2001: Gender and Development.

Department of Anthropology
University of Witwatersrand

ESSAY TWO – DUE 21st OCTOBER 2011

Write an essay on one of the following questions, using the reading material in your reading pack and, where possible, other research and readings that you discover independently.

The essays should be typed and between 2,000 - 2,500 words long, at 1.5 spacing and margins of at least 2.5 cm all around. Please number pages and ensure that your NAME and STUDENT NUMBER are on the upper right corner of the first/front page.

Choose one of the following topics/questions:

1) With reference to at least two ethnographic examples discuss the relationship between motherhood, militarization and resistance.

2) Batliwala and Ahanraj (2007:21) argue that it is a “gender myth” to assume that giving poor women access to economic resources - such as credit –will ensure their overall empowerment. Discuss what they mean by this idea of “gender myth” with reference to the shifts from Women in Development (WID) to Gender and Development (GAD).

3) With reference to at least two ethnographic studies explain and discuss the significance of heterosexual masculinities and femininities in shaping experiences of vulnerability to HIV/AIDS infection, treatment, and care.

4) With reference to Robert Morrell’s work on the shifting notions of masculinity (2001) as well as other relevant ethnographic examples discuss the role of race and class in shaping gender patterns in South Africa.

Please see the guidelines for information on referencing, essay structure and plagiarism. Extensions will only be granted in advance of the essay deadline and only with proof of extenuating…...

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