How Does Fitzgerald Tell the Story in Chapter Four of the Great Gatsby?

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How does Fitzgerald tell the story in Chapter Four of The Great Gatsby?
Chapter 4 of The Great Gatsby is one in which Nick continues to gradually piece together information about Gatsby, hearing about his romance with Daisy through the voice of Jordan Baker. Several settings are presented, conveying significant messages about the characters and the ‘roaring twenties’.
Chapter Four is one where Nick travels with Gatsby to New York and spends time with him in several different places. New York is presented as being both magical and somewhat repulsive, similar to how Nick feels ‘within and without’ the strange world of the ultra-rich. Viewing the city from the bridge, Nick describes it as promising ‘all the mystery and beauty of the world’, however, immediately after, ‘a dead man’ is described. This could be implying that the ‘jazz age’ is not all that it seems to be, with Fitzgerald revealing that the ‘mystery and beauty’ is only a façade hiding a much darker truth. In addition, the way that the ‘valley of ashes’ is described as opening ‘out on both sides’ could convey the poignant message that death is inescapable in this seemingly wondrous environment. Alternatively, Fitzgerald could be comparing the setting of New York with Gatsby. Before we are introduced to Gatsby, he is presented as almost mythical, magical, but mysterious, just as the city appears from a distance. However, meeting Gatsby could be seen as disappointing, as he is simply an ordinary, wealthy man with a vague, dark past. Gatsby could also be seen as the embodiment of the ‘American Dream’, a recurring theme throughout the novel, and so Fitzgerald could be drawing on these parallels to highlight that while The American Dream (or Gatsby) may be enticing, it is fundamentally corrupt and decaying, like the city of New York is presented in chapter four of the novel.
A key scene in chapter four is…...

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