Red Bead Experiment Lessons

In: Computers and Technology

Submitted By dickmagnet70
Words 2048
Pages 9
LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE RED BEAD EXPERIMENT

1) It's the system, not the workers. If you want to improve performance, you must work on the system.

Red beads were the result of a bad system; the Willing Workers were not the problem. The system is the problem. Dr. Deming stated 94 percent of the problems come from the system rather than the worker. Yet most efforts at improvement are aimed at the worker.

2) Quality is made at the top. Quality is an outcome of the system. Top management owns the system.

The systems developed by top mangers of an organization have far greater impact on the success of the organization than the best efforts exerted by Willing Workers. The decision to produce white beads in the first place; the decision to purchase beads from a particular supplier; the decision to use rigid procedures; and the decision to rely on mass inspection - all these decisions made by top management resulted in a system that contributed more than the Willing Workers to the waste, the lack of quality, and to going out of business.

3) Numerical goals and production standards can be meaningless. The number of red beads produced is determined by the process, not by the standard.

The production standard of three red beads per day was impossible to achieve. The Willing Workers could not affect the number of beads produced; meeting the standard was beyond their control. The "Voice of the Customer", translated by management into a goal of 3 red beads or less, had no effect on the number of red or white beads produced. No method was given.

Even if the goal is "possible", there is little to be gained by announcing such a goal to the workforce. If the goal is based upon what you expect can happen, then 50% of the time you will come in better than the goal, and 50% of the time you will come in worse (and set…...

Similar Documents

Spelling Lesson

...Spelling Lesson Plan for Kindergarten LESSON PLAN Name: V. Coy WGU Task Objective Number: 602.4.13-06 GENERAL INFORMATION | Subject(s): Spelling and Spelling Irregularities Topic or Unit of Study: Short Vowel Rule: A vowel followed by a consonant is short Irregular Spelling Rule: ck after a short vowel dock duck lock Grade/Level: 1st grade Instructional Setting: 32 Learners Venue: 2H classroom Sitting Arrangement: Normal, in Pairs STANDARDS AND OBJECTIVES | Your State Core Curriculum/Student Achievement Standard(s): 1.8: Spell three- and four-letter short-vowel words and grade-level-appropriate sight words correctly (California Department of Education, 2009). Lesson Objective(s): Given an already made beaded string, each student will copy the arrangement of beads and make their own. Each student will do this five times with ninety percent accuracy. Given a big card with a word stuck on it, another big but ‘empty’ card and other small cards each bearing a letter for the word stuck on one of the two big cards, the student will arrange the small cards on the ‘empty’ one to spell the word duck on the other card for each of the four words with at least 75 percent accuracy (at least missing only one letter). MATERIALS AND RESOURCES | Instructional Materials: * Beads of different color, shapes and Strings * Four cards for each learner bearing their name * Letter for each word to be spelt. *......

Words: 1610 - Pages: 7

Beads

...planning the design of our apparatus we knew that we would need a mesh filter in order to separate the alginate beads from the calcium chloride solution. Our entire design was based upon this. We started by designing a burette that would be able to drop the alginic acid into the calcium chloride solution at a steady pace that would facilitate the formation of spherical beads. To start, we drilled a hole into the bottom of a plastic test tube 15-mL conical tube and connected tubes and a valve to it. The valve can be screwed tight or loose, which controls the rate at which drops fall from the tube (tighter is slower; looser is faster). After the desired tightness was found for the viscosity of alginic acid, we used clamps to hold the test tube above the liquid solution. Next, we designed the bulk of the apparatus, which is where the CaCl2 solution will reside. We started by creating the mixer where the reaction would take place to form the gel. A 2-liter sprite bottle was used with the entire top cut off about 8 centimeters down from the cap. Then, we used the top of the 2-liter bottle, that we cut off, and covered the larger open side in mesh filter. The top was flipped upside down and fitted into the bottom of the rest of the 2-liter bottle so that there was a mesh filter separating the top of the reactor from the bottom. The purpose of this was to make sure that the gel beads must stay above the filter and therefore reside only the shallowest areas of the Calcium......

Words: 361 - Pages: 2

Red Beads

...Julianni Chan BADM388 September/09/2014 The Red Bead Experiment The was an experiment whereby there were five employees that were gathering the beads, there were two employees that counting how many red beads “defects” were in the count, there was also an overseer that was dismissing and reported what was the number that each brought defect beads. The daily production operation for each worker includes: 1) poring the beads from the first box into the second box and then back into the first box (to mix the beads), 2) dipping the paddle into the first box without shaking it, 3) carrying the loaded paddle to each inspector for separate counts and then verification, and 4) dumping the day's work back into the supply box. The six workers perform this operation four times to represent four days' work. Even with this “perfect” procedure and “excellent” management this process did not change the outcome of the experiment. This is because the management was actually bad based on that the manager of the business was showing bad management skills. Such as being a “jerk”, using a screening process on his employees, also treating his employee if they do badly they will be fired. He was also belittling them, he told them that there can’t be no communication with the employees, also he was very demanding. He also used some motivational practices that were ineffective. Such as giving the employee incentives which just cause employees to do anything to receive this incentive and may......

Words: 418 - Pages: 2

Experiments

...Examine the reasons why some sociologists choose to use experiments when conducting research. Study the reason why sociologist prefer to use experimental methods when carrying out a research There are many different types of experiments that can be conducted by sociologist, in order to help with the research that they are planning to carry out or just to help further prove their hypothesis. There are three main experimental methods that sociologists may choose to carry out their research/study. These three experimental methods are: Natural, field and Comparative. Each of these experiments has their own advantages and disadvantages. These positive and negative factors can analysed by practical, ethical and theoretical limitations and strengths that can be considered. This essay will be looking at each of these in detail. But, firstly what is an experiment? An experiment is a way of investigation a cause and effect relationship between independent variable and dependent variable. The first type of experiment that sociologist may choose to use in their research is, laboratory experiment. Laboratory experiments are conducted in a control setting, (this means that IV (The independent variable) and DV (dependent variable) can be controlled and manipulated by the researcher). Participant are given instruction to carry out certain tasks, in a normally manner. From this, the researchers are able to observe behaviour and be able to see cause and affect relationship between......

Words: 1585 - Pages: 7

Experiments

...Examine the reasons why some sociologists choose to use experiments when conducting research. Study the reason why sociologist prefer to use experimental methods when carrying out a research There are many different types of experiments that can be conducted by sociologist, in order to help with the research that they are planning to carry out or just to help further prove their hypothesis. There are three main experimental methods that sociologists may choose to carry out their research/study. These three experimental methods are: Natural, field and Comparative. Each of these experiments has their own advantages and disadvantages. These positive and negative factors can analysed by practical, ethical and theoretical limitations and strengths that can be considered. This essay will be looking at each of these in detail. But, firstly what is an experiment? An experiment is a way of investigation a cause and effect relationship between independent variable and dependent variable. The first type of experiment that sociologist may choose to use in their research is, laboratory experiment. Laboratory experiments are conducted in a control setting, (this means that IV (The independent variable) and DV (dependent variable) can be controlled and manipulated by the researcher). Participant are given instruction to carry out certain tasks, in a normally manner. From this, the researchers are able to observe behaviour and be able to see cause and affect relationship between......

Words: 1585 - Pages: 7

Experiment

...Experiment 6 Newton’s Second and Third Laws PHY 2091- 01 Experiment Performed : 03/2/15 Report Submitted : 03/20/15 Lab Partner: Nicholas Bautista Instructor: Introduction The experiment determines newton’s second and third laws using real life experiments such as the mass pulley system using the Atwood’s machine and using springs (2) in series and parallel to determine their spring constants and extensions when a mass is hanged from them. Newron’s second law states that the force on an object is directly proportional to the rate of change of momentum, which later gives the formula F =ma , m= mass and a is acceleration. Newton;s third law suggests that every action occurring on an object has an equal and opposite reaction when they occur in pairs, are acting in opposite directions and has same magnitude. In part one, we measure the acceleration of the mass pulley system using the photo gate. Data M1 = 151.25 g M2 =171.25 g Mean acceleration = 0.5992 m/s^2 Standard deviation 0.05463 Data Analysis Part 1 (Atwood’s Machine) – Formula and calculation of theoretical acceleration (ath) – A =(m1-m2)/(m1+m2) * g , ath= (0.17125-0.15125)/( 0.17125+0.15125)* 9.79 = 0.6083 m/s^2 % error = 0.05463/0.5592 *100 =9.76 % Formula and calculation of percent difference between ae and ath – % difference = (difference / A_th) *100 = (0.55992-0.6083) /0.6083 *100 =8.01% Part 2 (Springs in Series) – Hooke’s law equation –...

Words: 793 - Pages: 4

Experiment

...Experiment 2: The Chemistry of Copper I. Introduction Copper is one of the most important metals because it is one of the best conductors of heat and electricity and an alloying element in bronze and brass. Copper is a soft metal with a bright orange-brown color in which is often called “copper color”. Also, copper is an element that is chemically combined with several of compounds in nature. Usually, these compounds are blue or blue-green depending on the copper(II) species. In this lab we are to observe many of the physical and chemical properties of copper by cycling copper via several chemical reactions; those reactions being, Oxidation Reduction, Acid-Base and Oxidation-Reduction and Single Displacement Reduction. Lastly, while performing a series of chemical processes, the mass of copper recovered should equal the original mass of copper from the beginning. II. Data (Experimental Observations) Part A: Oxidation Reduction Reaction The weight of the copper starting material was 0.107g. After I weighted the copper, I wrapped the turning into a small ball and place it into a 150 mL beaker. Then, I measured 8 mL of 6 M nitric acid, HNO3, into a 10 ml graduated cylinder. Afterwards, I then slowly added the 6 M HNO3 into the beaker containing the copper. Then, I cover the beaker with a watch glass and observe the reaction. As I was observing the reaction, I noticed that the color of the copper solution went from a clear to a baby blue color. As the copper......

Words: 936 - Pages: 4

Experiments

...Examine the reasons why some sociologists choose not to use experiments when conducting research. 20 Scientists set out to discover scientific laws of cause and effect. The method favoured by natural scientists for discovering these laws is the laboratory experiments take place in labs are considered more artificial. In this essay I will conclude the reasons why experiments are not used to evaluate research. In addition the field and the comparative method will also be outlined as wells as their strengths and limitations which is used by sociologists in their research. Field experiments takes place in real social world. positivist sociologists use laboratory experiments as they favour a more scientific method. Positivist sociologists however also acknowledge the short comings of laboratory experiments, such as, it is often impossible or unethical to control the variables. Also their small scale means that results may not be representative or generalisable to the wider population. On the other hand interpretivists reject  the laboratory experiments because it fails to achieve their main goal of validity. It is an artificial environment producing unnatural behaviour.  There are various practical problems with laboratory experiments. Society is VERYhttp://cdncache-a.akamaihd.net/items/it/img/arrow-10x10.png complex and in practice it would be impossible to control variables that may influence a situation. Therefore although the ability to control variables in laboratory......

Words: 623 - Pages: 3

Experiment

...shinning the timer will be stopped and the time recorded. 5. Repeat the above steps with each brand of batteries. Reasoning I choose this experiment design because using a head lamp would be a normal use for the batteries. It will be easy to collect the data and easy to replicate. Sequence of Events The length of the battery life will be determined when the head lamp no longer shines light. 1. All batteries will be tested with a volt meter to make sure they are at 1.5 volts. 2. Two Double A batteries will be placed in the head lamp. 4. The head lamp will be turned on and the timer will be started. 5. The timer will be stopped as soon as the light quits shinning. 6. The length of the battery will be determined from the time the head lamp was turned on to when the light quit shining. Tools and Technologies Head lamp Different brands of batteries Voltmeter (volts) Timer (hours & minutes) Variables Independent variable: the battery brands. Dependent variable: the battery hours. Controlled variable: the head lamp. Threat reduction to internal validity I will be testing all batteries to make sure they are at 1.5 volts and aren’t past their expiration dates. I will use the same head lamp for each brand of batteries and will use only alkaline batteries for the test. Hypothesis The hypothesis of this experiment is that there will be less than hour difference of battery life between all brands of batteries tested. I came up with this hypothesis......

Words: 1104 - Pages: 5

Experiment

...EXPERIMENT 11: DETERMINATION OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN A WATER SAMPLE (WINKLER METHOD) INTRODUCTION In an alkaline solution, dissolved oxygen will oxidize manganese(II) to the trivalent state. 8OH-(aq) + 4Mn2+(aq) + 2H2O(l) --> 4Mn(OH)3(s) The analysis is completed by titrating the iodine produced from potassium iodide by manganese(III) hydroxide. 2Mn(OH)3(s) + 2I-(aq) + 6 H+(aq) --> 2Mn2+(aq) + I2(aq) + 6H2O(l) Sodium thiosulphate is used as the titrant. Success of the method is critically dependent upon the manner in which the sample is manipulated. At all stages, every method must be made to assure that oxygen is neither introduced to nor lost from the sample. Furthermore, the sample must be free of any solutes that will oxidize iodide or reduce iodine. Chemicals: Manganese(II) sulphate solution – prepared by dissolving 48 g of MnSO4.4H2O in water to five 100 cm3 solution; alkaline potassium iodide solution—prepared by dissolving 15 g of KI in about 25 cm3 of water, adding 66 cm3 of 50% NaOH, and diluting to 100 cm3; concentrated sulphuriv(VI) acid; 0.0125 M sodium thiosulphate solution; starch solution (freshly prepared). Apparatus: 250 cm3 volumetric flask, 250 cm3 conical flask, measuring cylinders, titration apparatus, magnetic stirrer Procedure: 1. Use a 250 cm3 volumetric flask to collect water sample. Fill the flask completely with water without trapping any air bubbles. 2. Add 1 cm3 of manganese(II) sulphate solution to the sample using a......

Words: 538 - Pages: 3

The Experiment

...The Experiment (2010) The Experiment is a thriller based upon a psychological study, ‘’Stanford Prison Experiment’’ conducted in 1971, where men are chosen to participate in the roles of guards and prisoners. Paul T. Scheuring, who also wrote the screenplay, directed the movie. The Experiment is a remake of the German movie Das Experiment (2001) both of which are loosely based on the novel Das Experiment – Black Box (1999) by German writer and actor Mario Giordano. Besides writing the book Giordano wrote the screenplay for Das Experiment. The movie is about an experiment that goes wrong. We follow Travis, a regular guy who gets fired and therefore says yes to participate in an experiment in exchange of money. For about a week he is being tested with a lot of others men. In this experiment-center he is asked about his past, his present and his future. So is everyone else. He then has to sit in a tiny, dark room with a slideshow of gruesome pictures and video clips. Thereafter 26 men are selected to be participate and are taken to the prison where they are given the roles of guards and prisoners. Here the participants are given five rules. Guards were informed that those prisoners who break the rules must be punished commensurately. The experiment is on for about six days until the prisoners finally tries to escape which leads to a big fight between the guards and the prisoners. Finally the red lights come on, the gates open and the experiment is over. The......

Words: 1185 - Pages: 5

Experiment

...Experiment 1 Title: Standardization of potassium permanganate solution by ammonium iron (II) sulphate Name: Toh Zi Xin Name of partner: Wong Jing Hui, Gan Chun Yiang, Wong Teck Jun Date: 17.6.2015 Lecturer: Dr. Neo Kian Eang Practical class: P4 Introduction: Potassium permanganate solution can be standardized by titration against a standard solution of ammonium iron(II) sulphate solution. This is an example of standardization, which is a process to determine the concentration of a solution by using it to titrate another solution which have a known concentration. This titration is known as redox titration as the titrant, which is the potassium permanganate is a strong oxidizing agent. The ammonium iron (II) sulphate solution is measured by using a pipette and transfer it into a conical flask while the potassium permanganate solution is placed in a burette. The ammonium iron (II) sulphate solution is made acidic by adding dilute sulphuric acid. Potassium permanganate solution is dark purple colour because of the presence of permanganate ions, MnO4- . Since potassium permanganate is a strong oxidizing agent, it can oxidizes iron(II) ions to iron(III) ions. Fe2+ Fe3+ + e- On the other hand, the Mn7+ ions of the dark purple colour permanganate ion, MnO4- are reduced to colourless Mn2+ ion. MnO4- + 8H+ + 5e- Mn2+ +4H2O As a result, the overall ionic equation is: MnO4- + 8 H+ + 5 Fe2+ →......

Words: 2374 - Pages: 10

Beads

...length: 7.5 inches Beads and other products needed for one bracelet: 19 - 4mm Crystal Golden Shadow CRYSTALLIZED™ - Swarovski Elements Crystal Rondelle Spacer Beads (SC5307) 9 - 6mm Platinum CRYSTALLIZED™ - Swarovski Elements Crystal Pearls (PL6669) 8 - 8mm Platinum CRYSTALLIZED™ - Swarovski Elements Crystal Pearls (PL6670) 1 - 16mm Crystal Golden Shadow CRYSTALLIZED™ - Swarovski Elements Crystal Pear-shaped Pendant (SC4480) 1 - 9mm Sterling Silver Toggle Clasp (SS3100) 1 - 5.8mm Sterling Silver 19 Gauge Jump Ring (SS3951) 2 - 2x2mm Sterling Silver Crimp Beads (SS4047) 2 - 4.7x3.4mm Sterling Silver Wire Guardians (SS4746) 12 inches - Clear Soft Flex Beading Wire .014 diameter (SM0100) Tools needed to complete the bracelet: Chain nose pliers Wire cutters Crimping pliers (TL0500) Beading Techniques needed to complete the bracelet: Crimping Using a Wire Guardian Add a Charm to a Chain (to learn how to open and close an ear wire and jump ring) For step-by-step photos and instructions on these and other techniques, visit FusionBeads.com and select Beading Techniques from the top navigation bar. Photography, text and jewelry design © 2009 FusionBeads.com Inc. Instructions to complete “Platinum Blond” bracelet: Step 1 Place one crimp bead and one wire guardian (see Using a Wire Guardian Technique) onto a 12-inch length of beading wire. String the wire through the other side of the wire guardian. String one side of the clasp, pass the wire back through the crimp bead, and......

Words: 403 - Pages: 2

Experiment

...priority in a causal relationship (cause precedes effect) There is consistency in a causal relationship (a cause will always lead to the same effect) The magnitude of the correlation is great. (Reference: en.wikipedia.org) The word experimental research has a range of definitions. In the strict sense, experimental research is what we call a true experiment. This is an experiment where the researcher manipulates one variable, and control/randomizes the rest of the variables. It has a control group, the subjects have been randomly assigned between the groups, and the researcher only tests one effect at a time. It is also important to know what variable(s) you want to test and measure. A very wide definition of experimental research, or a quasi experiment, is research where the scientist actively influences something to observe the consequences. Most experiments tend to fall in between the strict and the wide definition. A rule of thumb is that physical sciences, such as physics, chemistry and geology tend to define experiments more narrowly than social sciences, such as sociology and psychology, which conduct experiments closer to the wider definition....

Words: 290 - Pages: 2

Experiments

...SIMPLE SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS HANS JURGEN PRESS 1. Astronomy Image of the Sun Place a pair of binoculars in an open window in the direct path of the sun’s rays. Stand a mirror in front of one eyepiece so that it throws an image of the sun on to the opposite wall of the room. Adjust the mirror until the image is sharp, and darken the room. You would risk damaging your eyes if you looked directly at the sun through binoculars, but you can view the bright disc on the wall as large and clear as in the movies. Clouds and birds passing over can also be distinguished and. if the binoculars are good even sunspots. These are a few hot areas on the glowing sphere, some so big that many terrestrial globes could fit into them. Because of the earth’s rotation, the sun’s image moves quite quickly across the wall. Do not forget to re-align the binoculars from time to time onto the sun. The moon and stars cannot be observed in this way because the light coming from them is too weak. 2. Sun clock Place a flowerpot with a long stick fixed into the hole at the bottom in a spot, which is sunny, all day. The stick’s shadow moves along the rim of the pot as the sun moves. Each hour by the clock mark the position of the shadow on the pot. If the sun is shining, you can read off the time. Because of the rotation of the earth the sun apparently passes over us in a semi-circle. In the morning and evening its shadow strikes the pot superficially, while; it midday, around 12......

Words: 23291 - Pages: 94