To What Extent Was Hitler’s Foreign Policy the Main Cause of World War Ii

In: Historical Events

Submitted By lmancey1998
Words 674
Pages 3
To a certain extent, Hitler was to blame to the outbreak of World War II. The fact that he strongly believed he could reclaim the German losses under the Treaty of Versailles without any interference from the League of Nations, and the signing of the Nazi-Soviet Pact show that Hitler was determined, and wouldn’t settle for anything less than what he wanted. Hitler wasn’t the only one who was to be blamed for the second world war – the failures of the League of Nations and Treaty of Versailles, the practice of isolationism in countries such as the US, Britain and France, and appeasement were also to blame. The fact that Germany was limited to an extremely small army, 6 naval ships, and no air force, submarines or tanks at all was something that encouraged Hitler to build up an army, regardless of what the Treaty of Versailles stated. By 1936, the Germans had a total air force consisting of 5,116 planes, and were extremely close to overtaking the size of the British air force. This was eventually accomplished, as the Germans ended up with 5,606 planes in 1937. One of the main reasons for the outbreak of the war was that Hitler was certain he could regain everything that Germany lost as a result of the Treaty of Versailles. His certainty was appealing to the German people, as they felt they needed a strong leader who would provide them with ‘lebensraum’, or living space. With the growing amount of aircraft in possession of the Germans, Hitler, an extremely aggressive man, decided to invade what was left of Czechoslovakia in March 1939. Hitler was successful, as there was no interference from Britain or France. 6 months later, on 1 September 1939, he went on to invade Poland. This was a big mistake by Hitler, as 2 days later, France and Britain declared war against Germany. This was the beginning of World War II. This meant that Hitler was to be held…...

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