Women Oppression

In: Social Issues

Submitted By tgoddard111
Words 1660
Pages 7
Interview of the Oppressed Individual
Introduction
For centuries women has played the role of being the “underdog”; they have had to deal with being treated unequally in all respects. These women are being discriminated against based on their gender, this is known as sexism. Not only are women victims of sexism, but they are also victims of systematic discrimination, known as oppression. In the past, women were not known for their value as human beings and contributions to society as a whole; instead, they were confined to the home and valued for the children they could bear and reduced to the property of their husbands. Although women’s oppression has changed throughout time, it still remains a constant issue in today’s society.
Black Woman in Cooperate America Ms. Boyd is a Transition Assistant Manager at Allstate Insurance Company. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in English which helps her to adhere to her job description. Her job consists of training individuals in insurance sales and assists them in developing the correct skills to meet the long and short term goals of the company. Being that she is an African American woman in cooperate America, she is constantly faced with many troubles and she experiences unfair treatment being that she is a woman. This oppressed individual is constantly viewed as inferior to those around her because of her skin color as well as her gender. When interviewing her she informed me that men get paid $7,000 more in salary annually. She expressed great disposition when discussing this matter because men and women perform the same job description, so how is it fair that they are paid more? According to this oppressed individual she feels that women has to work three times as harder to get ahead, but being black on top of being a woman forces her to have to work ten times as harder. Ms. Boyd works at a company where woman are…...

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