Women Suffrage

In: Historical Events

Submitted By Badrsaud33
Words 2103
Pages 9
Women suffrage in America came at a time when the nation was deeply plunged in late 1800s. Passionate suffragists; Elizabeth Cady and Susan Anthony came out strongly to form the National Woman Suffrage Association to champion for the right of women to vote and hold public office in the late nineteenth century. Though women were oppressed of their rights to vote and shut out of what was considered male dominated white collar offices, they have made great strides in various fields in the recent years and have rose to high positions of power. From the first pioneers who engineered the Nineteenth Amendment of the American Constitution thereby by granting their fellow women the right to vote and equal opportunity for pursuit of high office, women have generally made tremendous steps in ensuring change in various field from politics, office jobs, what are considered manly jobs like masonry by male chauvinists to law professions and attaining high offices in the Judicial System. One instance where women acknowledge triumph in their pursuit in suffrage is United States Supreme Court appointing the first woman- Sandra Day O’Connor as the first woman justice in 1981. This proved their cause for equality was not all a matter of fighting a losing battle, they were making great impacts and strides in championing for the rights of women which is envisioned in future appointments of other women into the law profession. In eighteen seventy three (1873), Susan B. Anthony one of the sitting presidents of The National Woman Suffrage Association, was tried for casting an illegal vote in the presidential elections and was fined by the courts one hundred dollars but she declined payment of the same. She at the same time gave a speech propagating for the rights of women in society. Her speech strongly argues that she had committed no crime but rather had gone to the ballot in full…...

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