World Music Chapter 2

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Music In World Cultures Name: Natasha Fisher ____________________________________________________
World Music: A Global Journey
Chapter 2: Aural Analysis: Listening to the World’s Musics

I. Define the following terms:
Timbre: The tone quality or color of a musical sound
Pitch: A tone’s specific frequency level, measured in Hertz
Tuning System: All the pitches common to a musical tradition
Melody: An organized succession of pitches forming a musical idea
Melodic Contour: The general direction and shape of a melody
Drone: A continuous or repeating sound
Text Setting: The rhythmic relationship of words to melody
Rhythm: The lengths, or durations, of sounds as patterns in time
Dynamics: The volume of a musical sound
Form: The underlying temporal structure of a musical performance
Phonic Structure: The relationship between different sounds in a given piece
Monophony: Music with a single melodic line
Polyphony: The juxtaposition or overlapping of multiple lines of music
Homophony: Multiple lines of music expressing the same musical idea in the same meter
Independent Polyphony: Multiple lines of music expressing independent musical ideas as a cohesive whole
Heterophony: Multiple performers playing simulations variations of the same line of music
Organology: The study of musical instruments
Sachs-Hornbostel System: Standard classication system for musical instruments
Aerophone: Instruments that require are to produce sound-namely, flutes, reeds, trumpets, and bellows-driven instruments
Chordophone: Four types of stringed instruments: lutes, zithers, harps, lyres
Fret: A bar or ridge found on chordophones that enables performers to produce different melodic pitches with consistent frequency levels
Idiophone: Instruments that themselves vibrate to produce sound, such as rattles, bells, and various other kinds of percussion
Membranophone:…...

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